Why Fraser Island Qld Australia is a top location for weddings

FRASER Island’s breathtaking beauty continues to lure loved-up couples to its shores, with the tourist mecca emerging as the region’s top spot to tie the knot.

www.frasercoastcentral.com.au

Queensland Births, Deaths and Marriages records revealed there were 76 weddings at the island destination last year, followed by 70 ceremonies in Maryborough and 67 in Urangan.

Of the 341 weddings across the region, 52 were in Hervey Bay and 37 couples said their vows at Point Vernon.

Fraser Coast region celebrant Christine Smith said Fraser Island was a winner with couples from across Australia and overseas.

www.fcci.com.au

“They turn it into a holiday and it’s a holiday for their family and close friends as well,” she said.

“Just recently I had two weddings where the couples have come from England so they have brought family with them and friends from interstate.”

With the cost of the average Australian wedding climbing past $30,000, she is seeing people opting for weekday weddings to keep costs down.

“Being a destination like Fraser, people tend to go for a few days and they’re from away and flying in, so quite often it works out – also because everybody is budget-conscious it’s appealing to a lot of couples these days.”

Ms Smith said beach weddings were in demand across the Fraser Coast, including the Point Vernon foreshore and seaside locations in Urangan.

“They love the scenery, the sand, the idea of getting married barefoot; they just love it and they love the photos on the beach,” she said.

She said the Hervey Bay Botanic Gardens were also popular and some people opted for restaurants in Maryborough for their special day.

Hervey Bay celebrant Carol Gray said Fraser Island and other beach destinations attracted couples looking for locations with photo potential.

“There’s the beautiful backdrop of the ocean and the photography is at its peak in those areas; it’s just beautiful,” she said.

Ms Gray said Maryborough boasted beautiful gardens for weddings and The Esplanade in Hervey Bay was also popular.

“I think it’s the scenery; the best spots for perfect photography.”

An expert reveals: Style sins wedding guests should avoid

DON’T flash too much flesh, avoid cream at all costs and if in doubt, it’s better to be overdressed than underdressed.

Wedding guests can get it horribly wrong, wardrobe-wise – and with spring ceremonies cropping up on social calendars, a manners maven says it pays to avoid standing out for the wrong reasons.

Etiquette expert Anna Musson, of The Good Manners Company, said guests should always dress to impress.

“Dressing down is disrespectful; it says you can’t be bothered,” she said.

Ms Musson said it was essential to observe the dress code and not show too much skin.

“It’s about the bride and groom and everything should be drawing attention to them and not drawing attention away from them,” she said.

“If you’re wearing a backless playsuit, that’s drawing attention to you.”

MIND YOUR MANNERS: An etiquette expert says wedding guests should never ask to swap tables at the reception.

Her style don’ts for guests include denim, black and anything white or cream (strictly reserved for the bride).

She also recommended keeping shoulders covered at a day event and following the guide of the fancier the dress code, the longer the skirt length.

Dress codes can be a minefield, so if you are unsure what footwear is appropriate for a “beach chic” theme, she suggests clarifying beforehand instead of assuming thongs are acceptable.

“Check with the parents or the maid of honour; don’t go to bride and groom as they have a lot on their plate,” she said.

Once you have your attire sorted, she advises guests to avoid tacky behaviour such as asking if you can bring a plus one, getting drunk, complaining or requesting to swap tables at the reception.

It is also preferable to wait for the newlyweds to leave before making an exit.

“It’s bad form to leave before the hosts.” -NewsRegional

WEDDING SEASON

  • The most popular times to get married during the year are spring and autumn – in November and March.
  • June and July are the least popular months for weddings.
  • 56% of weddings take place on Saturdays.
  • 15% of weddings take place on Sundays.

Source: McCrindle 2015 Marriages and Weddings Report

Henry Sapiecha

As an anthropologist, I arranged to conduct a test on my 10-year marriage

It’s been a long time since I’ve conducted a sociological experiment. Trained as an anthropologist, my usual research locations were tropical climes, not my own home.

But this time it’s personal. The subject of this experiment will be Steve, the man who’s been sleeping in my bed for the last 13 years. The one who, maybe, I might take for granted.

Last year, we renewed our 10-year wedding vows and in doing so renewed some long lost romantic spark… but, now, the day-to-day has again started to wear us down.

Within couplehood, how do we ward off the mundane and preserve its romantic core? Will kindness engender kindness? And does investment in the little things keep the most important thing alive?

Experiment Take one grumpy wife plus one long-suffering husband and see what happens when wife performs 10 secret acts of kindness over 10 days. Explore the effects on said relationship. (Caveat: in order to prevent suspicion, acts of kindness will commence in a subtle, low-key manner. Would not want to risk husband having heart attack.)

Day 1: “I love you”

Involves Three seconds. Before hubby goes to work in the morning, I say, “I love you” meaningfully. As opposed to, “Mate, you’re seriously just going to walk out of the house and leave your @#$%^&* everywhere?”

Relationship effects None.

Day 2: “If I were in your shoes…”

Involves Empathy, changing viewpoint. Everybody stars in their own movie. The human mind is preoccupied with the self. But not so when first falling in love. During courtship, the other person is the clear movie star. What would he like? How does he feel? In other words: how can I make him want me more? In long-term relationships, rather than co-starring, over time, we cast our partners in less favourable roles: servant, villain, or even worse, bit character who inspires no intense emotions either way. Today I will be the director and focus my lens on my leading man. I will practise partner empathy and try to see everything from his point of view.

Relationship effects Slightly warmer between us. He calls me “Hun.” Pardon? It’s been ages since he’s used a cutesy name like that.

Day 3: A grand gesture

Involves Thoughtfulness, planning. The romantic pulse is often dulled within the confines of monogamy. To sharpen it, never underestimate the power of a grand gesture, especially if it’s a surprise such as a weekend away or tickets to a favourite band. Hubby’s birthday is tomorrow. (Yes, I know, a convenient time to conduct my “be nice missive”). Anyway, I book a restaurant and conspire with his mother that she fly over and surprise him at his birthday dinner.

Relationship effects Husband effortlessly steps into “starring” role. Whispers to me just before falling asleep, “Thank you so much for my birthday surprise.”

Day 4: Pen a love letter

Involves Gratitude, reflection. Husband is away for work. I write him a love letter about the things I admire and value in him. To throw him off, I get the kids to write him gratitude letters, too. Before kiddies leave for school the next day, we give him our letters.

Relationship effects Underwhelming. He reads them, smiles, and chucks them on the bedside table.

Day 5: Tender touch

Involves Physical love. My plan is to offer husband a massage. “Want a foot rub, honey?” I’m aware that this may cause deep suspicion and blow the experiment. Admission By the time hubby gets home from airport, this is so not going to happen. The next morning, however, I practise, er, “tender touch”.

Relationship effects Husband is happy but very confused.

Day 6: Total loving

Involves Extreme patience. Not one eye roll. Not one huff. I will step over his dirty ice-cream bowl left beside the couch and say nothing. I shall bite my fiery tongue. I will practise love through actions. Is this possible? Seemingly not. I fail the mission before we’ve even had breakfast. We bicker over little things throughout the day. I will try again tomorrow.

Day 7: Day 6, take two

Fail! Again. Urggggghhh! Hypothesis: Even if there is overriding goodwill between a couple, all can be instantly undermined by the murky sea of unresolved issues. Usually, for me, this pertains to gender division; for him, wishing I’d chill out.

Relationship effects Desire within me grows… to end this stupid experiment.

Day 8: Lie in

Involves A small sacrifice. I surprise hubby by not waking him on Saturday morning. Somehow he sleeps through the kids doing Just Dance and singing Despacito on repeat.

Relationship effect He is definitely smiling more.

Day 9: Freedom

Involves Space. I suggest he go out that evening and catch up with some friends.

Relationship effects Who knows? I’m fast asleep by the time he returns home from the bar.

Day 10: The way to a man’s heart

Involves Old-fashioned wisdom. Maybe once a week, I ask the kids in the morning, “What would you like for dinner?” (Son: pizza; daughter: sadly, two-minute noodles.) Around 5pm, miraculously these items appear on the dinner table. When is the last time I asked my husband what he’d like for dinner? Honestly, it was probably BC (before children). You know what my husband gets if he’s lucky enough for me to prepare his evening meal? Salad. Yep. Or, as the more hipster among us call it, a “dragon bowl”. I’m a vegetarian, so that’s usually what I’m eating.

Note My husband has never once complained about his raw vegetable meals. Although once I did catch him emailing a picture of his dinner to his mum. Half an avocado, a small pile of kidney beans and a bouquet of spinach leaves, undressed. Hubby is going to get the shock of his life tonight when I prepare him a steak, mashed potatoes and gravy. I may even light candles. Typical. Although husband said he would be home early, he is not. So dinner ends up being served the way he’s used to getting it – cold.

Relationship effect Despite lack of heat, he appears full and content. Me, as I do the dishes afterwards, not so much.

In conclusion, during this experiment, although there were many wonderful moments, the same unresolved issues kept cropping up. To be really happy, we must dig further, beyond kindness and sweet gestures, and fix the deep underground stuff.

Over the past 10 days, my husband’s perspective and his happiness were at the forefront of my mind. When I was kinder, he was kinder. The mood between us has shifted. It’s now more playful, more patient, more loving. Marriage is not a single experiment but a long-term one that takes continuous effort from both parties.

Dance like no one’s watching? How about, love like you’ve never been married. Why not see what happens if you put your relationship to the same 10-day experiment? Feel free to write in and share your experiences.

Henry Sapiecha

12 Great Handy Tips For an Easy Wedding on the Beach

Imagine a cool breeze, warm water and golden sand. You are walking in the midst of this beauty watching the sunset over the ocean. Beaches seem to be an ideal place to tie the knot, in addition ceremonies there don’t require difficult planning, huge budget and stress.

The decor is already created with the sand, sun and surf. If you want to plan the perfect beach wedding, the following tips are just for you.

1. Choose your beach. Public places are more accessible than private resorts. Choosing the last one you risk to spend a good chunk of change on it. So if you want to save money, pick a public beach, but remember that on a busy holiday weekend there will be prying public eyes or lots of wedding crashers.

2. Don’t forget about a permit. So if you have finally decided to have the ceremony on a public beach, try to make sure whether you need a permit for a wedding-sized gathering. Laws concerning open-containers and noise ordinances must be studied very carefully to avoid any potential trouble.

3. Make it intimate. You can save money on food, drinks and favors as well as increase the likelihood of obtaining a permit from the local authorities, if you keep your ceremony small.

4. Restrooms have to be close. Make sure that bathroom facilities are not far from the place of the ceremony so that your guests do not have to hike several miles in beautiful clothes to use the restroom.

5. Install a good sound system. Undoubtedly ocean is an awesome backdrop for your wedding, but the combination of waves and wind can make the sermon and vows sound too quite. The solution is a great sound system and musicians who play loud instruments like saxophones or guitars.

6. Rent a tent. Tents or canopies may protect your ceremony from possible rain or wind, provide shade and make the wedding more private.

7. Provide practical services. You can never predict Mother Nature, so keep all guests prepared for insects and useful elements of the wedding favors, as fans, bug spray, little bottles of sunscreen, or beach-themed anchor paperweight if you need to hold menus and name tags when wind picks them up.

8. Organize safe seating. It may be a complicated task to choose chairs, as you will place them at sand. So it’s better to pick heavier wooden chairs which won’t blow away.

9. Keep the casual style. Heavy wedding gowns usually cause a lot of troubles at a windy and hot seaside ceremony, so try to dress in a simpler clothes made of a light and comfortable fabric.

10. Control lighting. Choose a time of day with the best photo opportunities and don’t forget about the natural golden-hour gleam during sunset. Setting up cute hurricane lanterns for the evening should be also considered.

11. Forget about the shoes. If you don’t wear shoes, you don’t have problems! Full beach effect is achieved if you are barefoot, furthermore you save money on expensive heels. Perhaps your guests would like to be shoeless as well, so don’t forget about a special basket at the entrance where they can leave their footwear.

12. Consider changing a place for the reception. Having alcohol at a public place may cause unwanted issues so you should consider moving to another place after the ceremony.

www.handyhomehints.com

www.clublibido.com.au

www.celebrantsaustralia.org

Henry Sapiecha